Tag Archives: Plutarch

New Mentions of Agathocles!

I’ve been reading through Plutarch’s Lives, and I came across a mention of Agathocles I had missed when I was searching through the literature earlier!  It’s always great to find a new mention, no matter how minor.  The quote itself … Continue reading

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Spartan Women

I came across the below post on Tumblr recently, with some of the accompanying notes below, numbered for convenience.  It talks about Spartan women, often using colorful language, so if swears offend you, don’t read the rest of this post. … Continue reading

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Introductions

I’ve always found introductions to be the most difficult part of writing, and I’m sure quite a few people would agree with me.  I find it easier when writing fiction.  I usually start in media res with an especially interesting … Continue reading

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Agathoclean Anecdotes

I thought it might be interesting to collect some of the anecdotes about him that the ancient authors have left us.  I consider Agathocles to be an especially interesting figure.  His rise from obscurity, his boldness, his brilliance, his caring … Continue reading

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The Children’s Plutarch

This morning, I was thinking about Plutarch, as we all frequently do, and I wondered why I’ve never seen a version of Plutarch’s lives for children.  After all, I think a lot of readers of Plutarch would say that the … Continue reading

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Topsy-Turvy in Sparta

When one of the elderly men said to him in his old age, inasmuch as he saw the good old customs falling into desuetude, and other mischievous practices creeping in, that for this reason everything was getting to be topsy-turvy … Continue reading

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Pyrrhus and Cineas

One of my favorite quotes is from Plutararch’s Parallel Lives.  It’s from Pyrrhus’s life, the cousin of Alexander the Great, and the source of the phrase “Pyrrhic victory.”  He spent his life basically winning and losing brief empires, and died trying to … Continue reading

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